Got a Gig!!

handsontheharpTuning the harp is something I’ve learned to love.  You have to make it fun because it requires so much time.

Switching from piano to harp as my primary instrument required a learning curve that was unexpected and quite challenging.

Tuning.  And for a long time I hated it.   Today, however,  I can look back and see that it was the endless, enforced tuning of the harp that released my repressed musical self.     Comprende?

On Saturday afternoon, Nov. 7, I will be playing with my harp at the “Downton Abbey Tea” a fundraiser for a local library.  The event will be held at a local tea room.

Come!  Listen to me tune & play & tune again!   You’ll love it.

 

Now, back to tuning.  Along the way I stumbled on the frequency debate of 440 vs 432.  If you are a musician who tunes you probably know what I’m referring to.

Or maybe not.  Recently at the Harper’s Escape I met a very accomplished harpist who I immediately wanted to know better.  Later in the weekend, after we had shared a few classes, I asked to borrow her tuner.  It really doesn’t take much to knock a string out of tune.  However, immediately i noticed that her tuner was set to some bizarre number like 437……I corrected her device, with her permission, and then began to tell her what I’d learned about tuning frequencies.  For the time thus far into the weekend she had been unable to tune her harp so that it was in tune with the rest of us.  It was beyond frustration for her.  I explained what had happened and our friendship was forged.  The electronic tuner, like all devices, enable us to create settings that were nearly impossible before.

The difference between 440 & 432 hz  is quite an interesting read if you’re interested.  You might want to start here.

Bards & Bodies….vibration in action.

Trinity Library postcardI visited Trinity College Library in Dublin, Ireland a few years back and had what I consider an amazing experience there.

I was standing on steps, waiting with many other people to be allowed admittance into this magnificent space.

I arrived at this moment feeling pretty calm & healthy despite the joyful vibrations of extreme anticipation. Libraries are special places for me and I was about to enter the oldest library I had ever visited.

Suddenly, my heart starting beating twice as fast. My palms became sweaty. My face flushed into a raging shade of red. It was hard to breathe.

I became frightened and witnessed the negativity of those first thoughts. Am I ill? What is wrong with me?

I frantically began to retrace (in my mind) what I had to eat, the level of physical exertion I had been expending, etc., etc., coming to the conclusion that I was still healthy. This was ‘something else’.

I watched my mind decide to view the physical symptoms as evidence of karma at work.  No one was around who would challenge my viewpoint, for a change, so I  began to just take some long deep breaths to calm down this body . mysteryharp

Finally, I was allowed into The Room which immediately took even more breath away………..but, at the same time I became infused with a fiery impulse to investigate What Was In There For Me. I gave my feet complete permission to lead me around and within one minute of this absent-minded ‘absorption trip’ I came across this harp in a secured glass case perched on a large pedestal. As I stood there and gazed at this harp my body started calming down to a more relaxed state. My breath returned. It felt as if I had just returned …………………………………. home.

The body is a powerful antenna that picks up signals from a multitude of sources both internal & external. How we interpret these signals has everything to do with how our emotional minds process incoming information. Also, many of us have put ourselves in a position where we have relied on others (family, friends, our culture,) to define us to ourselves thereby weakening our inherent ability to discern reality clearly. Labels become words, and words can be limiting and hurtful. “You’re sick”. “You’re crazy”. “You’re paranoid”.

The information on the harp in the glass case describes it as “the oldest surviving Irish harp”, erroneously associated with Brian Boru, a high King of Ireland who died in 1014.

Before leaving for Ireland I had been practicing Brian Boru’s March. It was the very first tune I learned on my new harp.

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